Walking

Quantock Hills Spring Events

Posted on Mar 13, 2015

The Quantock Hills will be having spring events on Sunday 22nd March, Thursday 9th April and Sunday 26th April for more information and to book go to www.quantockhills.com/events/view

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Great Somerset Colour Run

Posted on Mar 13, 2015

The Great Somerset Colour Run will take place on Sunday 14th June 2015 for St Margaret’s Hospice. You can run, walk, skip or hop the 5k route whilst an army of volunteers throw powder paint through the route. Signing up is easy either phone 01823 365613 or visit www.greatsomersetcolourrun.co.uk

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Langport Walking Festival – June

Posted on Sep 27, 2013

Langport Walking Festival –  June

Two day walking festival in Langport Start: 42k from 07.30; runners 42k 08.30;; 20k from 08.30; 10/5k from 11.00 (all to finish by 18.00) Route: Each day, from The Angel, Bow Street, Langport Different routes each day across the Somerset Levels, Bowden and Ham Hills around Langport and its parishes

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Cheddar Gorge

Posted on Sep 27, 2013

Cheddar Gorge

Discover the heights of Somerset’s famous Cheddar Gorge Cheddar Gorge is one of England’s most iconic and spectacular landscapes. We are really proud to own the north side of this spectacular gorge and we hope that you will enjoy exploring it in a way that suits you. At almost 400 feet deep and three miles long, this is England’s largest gorge, and with its weathered crags and pinnacles, one of our most spectacular natural sights. The gorge would have begun forming about one million years ago during the last Ice Age when water from melting glaciers formed a river, which over time started to carve into the limestone rock creating the steep cliffs you see today. The Cheddar Yeo River gradually made its way underground, creating the famous Cheddar Caves....

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Brean Down

Posted on Sep 27, 2013

Brean Down

Promontory of land with dramatic cliffs and Victorian fort Brean Down is a spectacular location for a day out in Somerset. Enjoy relaxing on the beach at the foot of the Down, building sandcastles and visiting the Cove Café for some yummy food. Take an exhilarating walk to the top of the Down and venture the 1.5 miles it takes to the end by walking out to sea along Somerset’s greatest natural pier. The Down stands 97m high and the views from the top are truly spectacular, looking out over the Bristol Channel towards South Wales and over the Somerset Levels and stunning coastline. Uncover the secrets of Brean Down as you uncover its many layers of history, as you make your way towards The Palmerston Fort to explore its secret rooms. Pop into the Welcome Hut to find out more.  ...

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Stanton Drew Circles and Cove

Posted on Sep 27, 2013

Stanton Drew Circles and Cove

The village of Stanton Drew preserves the third largest collection of standing stones in England. Yet, perhaps because it lies off the beaten track, its remarkable prehistoric stone circles have not received the same level of interest and exploration as the more famous examples at Avebury and Stonehenge. This obscurity, and the lack of modern intrusions into their surroundings, have protected their solitude and character. The great stones (or megaliths) and the patterns they make in the landscape remain mysterious: however, recent surveys carried out here have yielded dramatic results, and helped to clarify our understanding of the site. There are three stone circles at Stanton Drew. The Great Circle, at 113 metres (370 feet) in diameter, is one of the largest in the country: it has 26 surviving upright stones, although there may once have been up to 30. The other two circles, to the south-west and north-east, are smaller. Both the Great Circle and the north-east circle were approached from the north-east by short ‘avenues’ of standing stones, most of which have fallen. In the garden of the village pub is a group of three large stones called The Cove, and to the north, across the River Chew, is the site of a standing stone known as Hautville’s Quoit. Their closeness to each other, and the alignments between some of them, indicate that together these stones formed a single complex. Stone circles like these are known to date broadly to the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age (around 3000–2000 BC), and many examples are known. Such circles are believed to have played an important part in contemporary social and religious life, and there is evidence that some were aligned with major events of the solar and lunar calendar. http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/stanton-drew-circles-and-cove/history-and-research/...

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