Bird Watching

Watch a flock of starlings form a Murmuration

Posted on Sep 28, 2013

Watch a flock of starlings form a Murmuration

Watch a flock of starlings form a Murmuration Every year between Autumn and February, Somerset starlings flock together over the Somerset Levels & Moors to create huge and magnificent starling murmurations. Surely one of nature’s best and most magnificent sights, the starlings form into sweeping ball like shapes in their thousands, sometimes hundreds of thousands before flying down and roosting in the trees. Although the murmurations can be seen across the Somerset Levels, the best places to see them are at – the National Nature Reserves of Westhay Moor and Shapwick Heath and RSPB Ham Wall....

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Viaduct Fisheries – Somerton

Posted on Sep 28, 2013

Viaduct Fisheries – Somerton

The Viaduct Fisheries is one of the prettiest and most natural commercial fisheries in the country. Six well stocked lakes nestle in the beautiful Cary Valley. Constructed in the early eighties, the complex is very mature, with great character. This includes tree covered islands, lily beds, gullies and many marginal features. The stock is varied with many carp, including “species” to 28 lbs; these are complemented with a healthy stock of “silvers”, by which we mean an impressive mix of bream,perch, tench, rudd and roach. Also present are large eel and the occasional chubb. Fully pathed with 136 proper timber fishing platforms car parking and disabled access together with Woodys Cafe....

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Fishing the River Parrett

Posted on Sep 28, 2013

Fishing the River Parrett

The river contains mostly roach, along with skimmer bream, perch and chub. Larger bream are sometimes caught and occasionally tench and carp can be tempted. There is also a good head of pike. Our waters start at Huish Bridge and flow down through the Town, past the Bungalows and Cocklemoor. Try caster, maggot or hemp and tares for roach and caster or maggot for skimmer bream, perch and chub. Tench and bream can also be found further down Cocklemoor, above the Pumping Station. At the lower end of Cocklemoor, above and below the footbridge, chub will be found in the lilies and under the overhanging trees and bushes on the opposite bank. Maggot, worm or breadflake are worth trying for them. Just below Bow Bridge, at the top end of the Stuckies section, roach, skimmer bream and chub are the main species. Maggot, caster or hemp and tares are the main baits used. Bread is worth considering as people feed the ducks from Bow Bridge. A chub of 6lb 2oz has been caught from here. The remainder of the Stuckies section, down to the island, produces roach, perch and the odd larger bream. A waggler, fished shallow and tight across to the far bank, will often find small chub. More information on the web site...

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Brean Down

Posted on Sep 27, 2013

Brean Down

Promontory of land with dramatic cliffs and Victorian fort Brean Down is a spectacular location for a day out in Somerset. Enjoy relaxing on the beach at the foot of the Down, building sandcastles and visiting the Cove Café for some yummy food. Take an exhilarating walk to the top of the Down and venture the 1.5 miles it takes to the end by walking out to sea along Somerset’s greatest natural pier. The Down stands 97m high and the views from the top are truly spectacular, looking out over the Bristol Channel towards South Wales and over the Somerset Levels and stunning coastline. Uncover the secrets of Brean Down as you uncover its many layers of history, as you make your way towards The Palmerston Fort to explore its secret rooms. Pop into the Welcome Hut to find out more.  ...

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Thorney Lakes

Posted on Sep 27, 2013

Thorney Lakes

The Lakes are two acres each, stocked with a selection of course fish including large carp up to 25lbs, bream, roach, tench, Gudgeon, goldfish, chubb, perch, and eels. A haven of peace, quiet and relaxation. So relax, soak up the silence and live life at a gentler pace… A family run business established in 1993, the setting attracts a host of wildlife and regularly visited by otters, badgers, rabbits, deer and 70 species of birdlife (RSPB survey), including kingfishers nesting on site. Just a short level walk from the caravan park, the two miles of nature trails are perfect for a short stroll or to enjoy a chat with the local fisher folk about the ‘one that got away!’ There is ample parking, a thatched shelter and disabled access. Our traditional beef and cereal farm has earned a ‘Somerset Otter’ award for conservation and we pride ourselves in taking good care of this picturesque landscape. Our secluded lakes cover approximately 4 acres and are well stocked with a selection of course fish including large carp, (up to 25lbs)....

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River Parrett Trail

Posted on Sep 27, 2013

River Parrett Trail

The River Parrett is one of the main rivers draining the Somerset Levels, or Plain of Sedgemoor. Its source is the green hills on the Dorset and South Somerset border at Chedington, from where it flows northwards to enter the Bristol Channel near Burnham on Sea. The River Parrett Trail is one of England’s beautiful ‘source to mouth’ river routes all of which offer fabulous walking enhanced by the fascinating  presence of water. The River Parrett Trail can be enjoyed as a 50 mile hike over 3 or 4 days or as a series of shorter walks exploring some of England’s most beautiful, intriguing but also fragile countryside. This is comfortable walking through the gentle hills of the Dorset and Somerset borders and across the wetlands of the Somerset Levels and Moors. It is also a fascinating journey through orchards, woods, withy beds and the watery haunts of birds and fishermen; passing limestone cottages, Georgian terraces, elegant mediaeval churches and the elaborate pattern of rhynes and water courses of the low land.  On the way you can visit Ham Hill – the site of one of Europe’s largest Iron Age hill forts, Stoke St. Gregory – the heart of the Somerset willow growing and basket making industry, Burrow Mump and Athelney – where the Saxon King Alfred found a refuge from the Vikings (and burnt the cakes).  At Ham Hill the route links with the Liberty Trail and the Leland Trail. http://annierak.hoofbags.me.uk/parretttrail.html Follow the River Parrett from the source in Chedington in Dorset to the mouth in Bridgwater Bay, Somerset. The route first heads to Langport passing Haselbury and the 16th century English Heritage owned Muchelney Abbey. You continue north through Langport and onto Burrowbridge where you will pass the interesting geological and historical site at Burrow Mump. The river then takes you towards Bridgwater passing the Westonzoyland Pumping Station Museum. This Industrial Heritage museum is dedicated to steam powered machinery and makes for a fascinating few hours. The final section takes you through Bridgwater and Combwich before finishing at the beautiful Steart Nature Reserve on Bridgwater Bay. http://www.gps-routes.co.uk/routes/home.nsf/routeslinkswalks/river-parret-trail-walking-route...

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